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Easy Ed's Broadside

Exploring music without a map.

Since 2009, Ed has shared his thoughts on ND about music that touches him, and rambled hither and yon about what else is on his mind.

Easy Ed's Broadside

Exploring music without a map.

Since 2009, Ed has shared his thoughts on ND about music that touches him, and rambled hither and yon about what else is on his mind.

Bringing Mountain Music to the City

Good luck with all that Ed...I sat in with a jam like that a few times, and while not quite at that level numbers wise, we have some great players around here, a few who could play with anyone (and  couple who have)...you will learn your place in the hierarchy pretty quickly...sounds like you were humbled a bit, but not discouraged enough to stay away, which is how I'd describe my experience, in general the really good players are still encouraging...as you noted, making music is the only thing better than listening to it (or in your case, writing about it).  Rave on Ed...

Funny, fun, and appropriately humbling piece, Ed. Rest easy though, every newby entering a jam has the same experience, and sticking with it can only lead to improvement. Thanks for writing this.

As I dilettante mandolinist I can sympathize with your plight/pleasure.  As much as I love listening to great players, there is nothing that compares to playing at any level despite the insecurities and discomfort (both physical and mental) that go with being an an occasional player.  Playing in a jam, even when I struggle to keep up, is one of my favorite things to do.

   Great thing about bluegrass is the jams, face it, most musicians love to jam. And when you are at a festival, everyone has their instrument.  And in most cities, if you look around, you will find one somewhere.