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Crowdfunding Campaigns of the Week: Vinyl re-issues from Petty, McCartney, and R.E.M.

Tom Petty. Photo by Music Entropy/Creative Commons license

The resurgence of vinyl in the past few years has been an interesting thing. Not only have records made a comeback (as have, inexplicably, cassettes, but that's another column) but they're the only physical media that is growing, and practically the only purchased media that's still in the positive. This has led many bands to ensure there is a vinyl component to their new releases, but has also led to a scramble for classic albums, many of which were on vinyl the first go around, to get a vinyl re-issue. This week's column is dedicated to three such vinyl re-issues.

 

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers- The Studio Vinyl Collection 1976-1991

When Tom Petty died unexpectedly a couple of weeks ago it drove home just how universally loved he was, as tributes poured in from across the musical spectrum. I knew this from a couple of decades ago when I did overnights at a country radio station with a “rocking country” gimmick that allowed 2-3 country-friendly rock songs per hour. Petty was far and away the most requested artist by the station's country fans. For those looking for a deep dive into Petty's catalog, PledgeMusic is offering the massive Studio Vinyl Collection for sale now. Petty's first nine albums are in the bundle, including classics like Full Moon Fever and Damn the Torpedos. But this is not a collection for the casual fan, or the broke one. The collection will set you back $364.

 

Paul McCartney Archive Collection

Much of Paul McCartney's post-Beatles output has been hit and miss, but when it hit, it hit big. Now McCartney is offering archive releases, on both vinyl and CD, of eight of his post-Beatles albums with Wings, Linda McCartney, and solo. Unlike the Petty box, McCartney's releases are available individually and in smaller bundles, making them more budget conscious. Among the releases included are Wings' Band on the Run, Paul & Linda McCartney's Ram, and Paul's solo Pipes of Peace.

 

R.E.M.- Automatic for the People

The worst part about being a Gen X'er is the nearly constant reminder of how old you're getting when bands from your youth release “anniversary editions” of their classic albums. For those who, like me, had a steady diet of R.E.M. in college, 1992's Automatic For the People was probably among those. Now 25 years old, the album is getting a deluxe CD release. The deluxe edition includes a live show and a Blu-Ray edition of the album in Dolby Atmos sound. But for vinyl fans, the real treat is the vinyl re-issue of the studio album as-is.