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Easy Ed's Broadside

Exploring music without a map.

Since 2009, Ed has shared his thoughts on ND about music that touches him, and rambled hither and yon about what else is on his mind.

Easy Ed's Broadside

Exploring music without a map.

Since 2009, Ed has shared his thoughts on ND about music that touches him, and rambled hither and yon about what else is on his mind.

The Day My Guitar Gently Weeped

What were the issues involved that wouldn't allow it to stay in tune?
 

Just resign yourself to spending a good part of the day travelling to and from Staten Island.  In your situation, it's worth it.

If you can wait a year or so to have one made for you, you can also find lots of fine luthiers to make one for you.  It isn't necessarily any more expensive than a comparable instrument made in a factory.

My buddy in Queens affirms that you have to take that ferry ride to Staten Island for Mandolin Brothers. And avoid Sam Ash, Matt Uminov or Guitar Center. (This ended up on your Broadside page, wondered why the other comments made no sense re: the subject.)

Nice piece, Ed. When I went looking, after I divorced my high end banjo I could never get enough notes from, I had a long chat with a vendor selling Martin and Collings guitars at retail. After a lengthy conversation about what my goals were, he sent me to Tim Finch, the Eastman vendor who's at the Gettysburg Bluegrass Festival every year. After some discussion, I bought an Eastman OM10 at a price that made sense. Since that day, I've played it nearly every day with pleasure, and when I work up my courage to go to jam, people seem to like its sound. 

If a well-made Chinese guitar that sounds good and looks pretty ain't your style, come on up to New England and look around. There's a terrific shop in Brattleboro called Maple Leaf Music that carries a wide range of new and used instruments.  You could stop there on your way to the Jenny Brook Bluegrass Festival in a couple of weeks.  If that's not good enough for you, you might travel to Ashland, NH on the first weekend of August to visit the Vintage Fret Shop, a quirky little place filled with all kinds of new and used instruments.  It's also a good side trip while you're enjoying the Pemi Valley Bluegrass Festival in Thornton, NH. Shopping for instruments is half the fun of owning them. Hope to meet you at one of these events.

There are a number reasons why a guitar won't stay in tune. For the Epi it turned out to be mostly related to the bridge which was barely being held on by one lonely bolt and the bridge plate underneath was deteriorating. The frets on the neck were also worn down and out. 

As for that ferry ride, I worked the search engines and consulted a new friend who is a longtime dealer. At a thousand bucks give or take, I wanted a dread with solid wood. Came down to Eastman, Seagull and Blueridge. I tossed out the Taylor's...good mid-range but no bottom. The Guilds hold promise, but the new owners have yet to switch the current production line. 

Those who are old enough to remember, 48th and Broadway was once upon a time the music instrument haven. Now there is only Rudy's left and they deal in those three I mentioned. After hanging out with Rob for a few hours I chose the Eastman 20D with Adirondack spruce top, rosewood back and sides and an ebony fretboard. They worked with me on the price and their tech did a custom setup to my needs...lots of open tunings. I'm a happy dude. But it's been a few years since I last had a 12 string in my collection...

Get a standard Martin D 18 or D 28. Get it mail order from Elderly Instruments. They are the best, they will give you the lowest price, and the guitar will be checked out by their repair department before they ship it.  Splurge and get an HD 28. You cannot buy from a better place. Elderly. Been dealing with them since the seventies.  Anyone remember the seventies?