Column

Easy Ed's Broadside

Exploring music without a map.

Since 2009, Ed has shared his thoughts on ND about music that touches him, and rambled hither and yon about what else is on his mind.

Easy Ed's Broadside

Exploring music without a map.

Since 2009, Ed has shared his thoughts on ND about music that touches him, and rambled hither and yon about what else is on his mind.

Just Who Is the Galway Girl?

That's fantastic, and a great live version...there's a bassoon player in there...and a dancing little girl with a t-shirt that says "Eat, Drink, Hurl, Repeat"...

Glad you ran across that clip Ed...inspired column!

Another captivating piece, amigo.  I'm a bit of an Hibernophile, so I've been on to Mundy for some time...thanks for hipping the ND crowd to him.  Galway Girl is one of my wife's (Bridey) favorite songs.  We were in Galway two years ago and found a fantastic trad pub -- Tig Coili http://www.tigcoiligalway.com/home.html -- which sounds a lot like someplace Earle might have haunted.  You didn't talk about the distinction of being "Black Irish", or a person of Celtic origin whose ancestors (willingly or not) mixed with the invaders of the Spanish Armada.  I believe that's how you arrive at the phenomenon of a lass with raven hair and blue eyes.  When I played Ballybunion Golf Club in County Kerry the first time we visited Ireland (2001), our caddy told us a harrowing tale of a Spanish ship that ran aground off the coast and took shelter in a hollow a few kilometers from the shore.  When the Irish found them hiding, they clubbed them to death. I managed to hit my tee shot down there, and he refused to retrieve it, as the bones are said to remain to this day...

The only time we heard Galway Girl in the town of its origin occurred as we were walking back to our hotel and were drawn into a pub by its unmistakable melody.  The band fairly "crucified it", to paraphrase Mellencamp from I Saw You First.  It's pretty amazing that an American's revelation about an Irish lass ended up being widely celebrated by the very culture it sought to depict. High praise, indeed.  Thanks for making the day more interesting...

Did the caddie advise the club you hit the errant shot with, or was it your call?  Just curious...I can hear him to this day telling golfers not to hit a 5 iron from here or "you'll retrieve your own ball"..."not a large enough tip in the world"

Apparently the Irish appreciate both the song and the sentiment expressed...Mr. Earle seems quite pleased with how that all turned out and you would be...as he noted, the song will live on...he's not native to Ireland, but Galway Girl is definietly an Irish folk song at this point...

 

 

It was a driver and, no, we didn't have a discussion until I had skulled it (pardon the pun) into the ravine.  I believe he said something to the effect of "You're fecked". Then he regaled us with his history lesson.  It is a notoriously difficult course -- no fringes and plenty of cliffside hazards.  They require all players to have a handicap of 18 or lower, but we just had to get off the first tee without looking like total hackers.  The caddies, of course, were on to the duffers in the group from the start...

A good tip remedies the hacker issue...

"You're fecked"...thank you for responding to my question as that...made my day, very funny and no doubt said in all seriousness...

The golf courses in the UK...a very different breed...I like your description...reminds me of watching part of the British Open at St Andrews in Scotland I think...between the course and the weather, I felt bad for the players...insanely windy, the occasional squall, and as you noted cliffside hazards...and they probably have their own legend or lore as well...

 

I've seen Steve Earle perform several times and he always tells these stories before performing Galway Girl.  He also says he was trying to fit in.  I guess it worked.

Wow. Hugely surprised to see this pop up in my No Depression news feed, as I sit here in Galway :-)  Last year's street performance would have featured a lot more people if only Galway's streets were wider. Loads of people showed up but couldn't get anywhere near the actual event. Here's a clip of "Galway Girl" Joyce Redmond, duetting with a worse-for-wear Shane MacGowan (and Sharon Shannon) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Thum1vBAndE

Thanks so much for the column.  I've loved that song since the first time I heard it.  Now I've got two more versions of it to go and find.  

Ed, if you ever rename this column, "Nuggets" or "Pearls" might make sense, love the frequently off the beaten path topics. Hadn't heard anyone's version of this song before, the video of the street festival is magic.  If I hadn't read the story behind the song I may still have thought Earle's version a bit wistful. Certainly it's not bursting with joy like the version in the street festival video. Great tune.  

My friend and coworker sent me this video at some point in the last bit or so. Great energy. I fell for Steve Earle's version a year or two back. Head over heels. Also love The High Kings' version (members being relatives of Liam Clancy, my hero, and various other Irish musicians of note). 

I didn't know the whole backstory of the song and was glad to see it. I must've missed this post for some reason when it came up - I would've figured out my password sooner!

Speaking of Steve... was reading his bio a few months back (just found another one by a different author) and decided to recheck out all of his albums. I had only his "Copperhead Road", "Guitar Town", "Galway Girl", and "One More Cup of Coffee (Valley Below)" (with Lucia Micarelli). Also, his take on Gram Parsons' "My Uncle". Don't know how I missed "The Mountain" with the Del McCoury Band, but adore the song. There are various other songs I like, of course, but those being the main.

Been to see Bob Dylan and U2 both in concert in the past few months. Was my second time seeing Bob and it was just as weird and surreal as the first time. At least this time I knew what to expect! An acquaintance ofmine also went and said something along the lines of: "What the HELL was that?!" and "You knew what was coming and paid for tickets a second time?!" U2 was phenomenal. Just a huge massive stadium. It was like a religious experience howling along with that many people. I bonded with the fellow next to me and we shouted our way through "I Will Follow" together. He had confessed that it was his favourite and he was worried they wouldn't play it. It was one of the last in the encore sequence.

https://www.thestar.com/entertainment/music/2017/06/24/u2-brings-the-age...

https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/bob-dylan/2017/budweiser-gardens-london-o...

Lumineers opened for U2. Three songs of theirs are now on my ipod. Others that I've been into lately include: Arlo Guthrie's take on "Percy's Song", Nirvana unplugged (especially their Leadbelly - my coworker says: "He sounds like he's in pain." I didn't know how to respond, but with "It's KURT COBAIN, of course he was in pain.) ...JP Harris' take of "Amarillo Highway" and can't count how many times I played Bob Dylan's "Boots of Spanish Leather". Have no idea why that hasn't been on my playlist for years. I've owned the album for years! That's what I love about Bob - he grows with you. Different tracks stand out at different times in my life.

A bit of a ramble I know. My trademark! Anyways - LOVE "Galway Girl" - great piece!

- Stina

You definitely need more Steve Earle...I could make you a mix-tape if you have an eight-track player. By the way....you have no idea how many ways I abhor Bono. Nevertheless, welcome back. 

You wouldn't believe how many people in the past couple of years I've had asking if we had an 8-track player, but they won't take the tapes.

With Bono, you have to look past the sheen or slim that some of his characters have had. I like the Bono underneath the rolls he plays. He usually means well.

Bono is a bit bombastic.  About 15-16 years ago, my sister in law was a college student "studying" in Rome for a semester. She and a friend took a vacation in Dublin, and one of her brothers flew over to join them. They decided to see if they could run into Bono. I think this was a couple pints into the afternoon. They traipsed around Dublin, the U2 studio, other places. The brother finally realized how foolish the idea was, told the girls so, and left to go find lunch. The girls finally walked to the Clarence Hotel, figuring if some of the band owned it, they might be there. Guinness logic. So they were standing around in front of the hotel and right at the time they were concluding their quest was goofy, a Mercedes pulls up and out gets Bono.  He sees the two girls, realizes why they are standing there, and walked over, chatted with them for a few minutes, gave them a hug and kiss and said he had to go inside to find his friend Bobby. So they stood there amazed at their good fortune and figured if he went in, and the car is still in front, he must be coming back out. About 10 minutes later Bono walked out with Bobby.....DiNiro. Not a bad two-fer.  They later reconnected with the brother who joked about their effort until he heard the story.

Isn't every song he's ever written an anthem?  U2...not my cup of tea in general...I've tried...Bono...meh...people like him/them...

DiNiro on the other hand...fine actor...one of the best...made a few really crappy films, but mostly good ones, and a few of the very best...so I'd say the girls scored big, since Bono was the main target and DiNiro is a huge bonus...after a few Guinness, I likely would have gone along...what's not to like about roaming Ireland?...

Welcome back Stina!

 

Maybe if he lost the sunglasses and the aura of pretension....

Maybe if he lost the sunglasses and the aura of pretension....

Maybe if he lost the sunglasses and the aura of pretension....

Saying it three times is redundant. No?

It's very effective too...puts emphasis on the point you are making IMO...sort of like repeating "and you give yourself away" over and over and over and over and over in a song...

Was at the Rock and Roll HOF in Cleveland when they had the Bono, er U2 exhibit on the top floor...my wife and I were up there for a few minutes and she just looked at me and she said, "I've heard some of the songs...these guys can't be that important"...this is someone who never heard Les Paul but spent half an hour looking at the history, his guitars etc.  I said, "they aren't"...good thing there's 4 other floors there...

It's cold in Cleveland in the winter...

 

Redundant, yes, sounds therapeutic for you though.

10-12 years ago saw a Wednesday night show by the Flying Other Brothers. The club owner is a buddy, he said let's go see these guys, my sound guy is telling me they are bringing in some fancy, very expensive equipment and they have Pete Sears on keyboards and GE Smith on guitar.  The club had had a cancellation and this band had called last minute out of the blue asking if he had an opening. He said he did but couldn't pay much on basically no notice, they agreed on a couple hundred. So the curiosity was who these guys with the expensive gear and Sears and Smith were.  It was a pleasant enough set, GE Smith was good on guitar with none of his TV histrionics. The singer had longish hair, John Lennon glasses and a tie dyed shirt. When the club went to pay the band they said, don't worry about it, we enjoyed playing here. They were giving away discs post show. Grabbed one, read the liner notes. The singer with the glasses and shirts name was Roger  McNamee. About a month later and us never figuring out why all the fancy gear, Sears and Smith, and declining payment, I was sitting on the beach reading the Sunday NY Times and saw a picture in the business section atop an article about Elevation Partners, an investment fund. In the picture was Bono and four other guys, the five partners in the Elevation Fund. Read the caption, one was Roger McNamee, a multi millionaire fund manager.  Took me a few minutes to remember where I knew the name. So that explained the expensive gear, band members and why they declined payment. The Flying Other Brothers morphed into Moonalice. Never know who you'll meet in a club.

Therapy, or is the ND post mechanism on delay again?  You know, where you don't think posts, so you hit submit again, and the your post is out there 6 times and you can't figure out how to delete?

Regardless, I was amused...Pretension...Aura...Roger McNamee...Flying Other Brothers...somehow that all fits my Bono narrative...

 

 

 

I can't argue the pretension, but it's funny that a lot of people don't know why he wears the sunglasses. He says he catches all kinds of flack for it. He has a vision problem (glaucoma) that requires the sunglasses. He's had treatment over the past few decades, but the glasses help with light sensitivity. He does pick some obnoxious looking glasses sometimes though - I guess that's the "Rock Star" part of it. LOL.

Don't even get me started on Ireland! It's one of my fondest dreams to go there. Was really hoping and having fingers crossed that it happens next year. I have the air miles for the trip to and from. (Unless the buggers raise the rates, etc again.) It's the dream!

Grand stroke of luck. I like Robert also. Fine actor though I haven't seen large quantities of his work. Hell of a story! I'm not sure if they still are, but I had heard that U2 (or at least Bono) lived in France - trying to outrun large Irish taxes on his money. At least part of the year anyways. Not sure of this is true or if it was, is it still. 

Bono lives in Kalamazoo Michigan. He is trying to qualify for the last bit of recognition that has escaped him: Americana Music Association Artist of The Century. 

I know it's only 2017, but maybe they can just do that now so we don't have to hear about it later...or is he going for the 20th century instead?  

Steve Goodman had a song..."The 20th Century is Almost Over"...pretty sure there was verse in there about Bono...