Column

Easy Ed's Broadside

Exploring music without a map.

Since 2009, Ed has shared his thoughts on ND about music that touches him, and rambled hither and yon about what else is on his mind.

Easy Ed's Broadside

Exploring music without a map.

Since 2009, Ed has shared his thoughts on ND about music that touches him, and rambled hither and yon about what else is on his mind.

Just Who Is the Galway Girl?

That's fantastic, and a great live version...there's a bassoon player in there...and a dancing little girl with a t-shirt that says "Eat, Drink, Hurl, Repeat"...

Glad you ran across that clip Ed...inspired column!

Another captivating piece, amigo.  I'm a bit of an Hibernophile, so I've been on to Mundy for some time...thanks for hipping the ND crowd to him.  Galway Girl is one of my wife's (Bridey) favorite songs.  We were in Galway two years ago and found a fantastic trad pub -- Tig Coili http://www.tigcoiligalway.com/home.html -- which sounds a lot like someplace Earle might have haunted.  You didn't talk about the distinction of being "Black Irish", or a person of Celtic origin whose ancestors (willingly or not) mixed with the invaders of the Spanish Armada.  I believe that's how you arrive at the phenomenon of a lass with raven hair and blue eyes.  When I played Ballybunion Golf Club in County Kerry the first time we visited Ireland (2001), our caddy told us a harrowing tale of a Spanish ship that ran aground off the coast and took shelter in a hollow a few kilometers from the shore.  When the Irish found them hiding, they clubbed them to death. I managed to hit my tee shot down there, and he refused to retrieve it, as the bones are said to remain to this day...

The only time we heard Galway Girl in the town of its origin occurred as we were walking back to our hotel and were drawn into a pub by its unmistakable melody.  The band fairly "crucified it", to paraphrase Mellencamp from I Saw You First.  It's pretty amazing that an American's revelation about an Irish lass ended up being widely celebrated by the very culture it sought to depict. High praise, indeed.  Thanks for making the day more interesting...

Did the caddie advise the club you hit the errant shot with, or was it your call?  Just curious...I can hear him to this day telling golfers not to hit a 5 iron from here or "you'll retrieve your own ball"..."not a large enough tip in the world"

Apparently the Irish appreciate both the song and the sentiment expressed...Mr. Earle seems quite pleased with how that all turned out and you would be...as he noted, the song will live on...he's not native to Ireland, but Galway Girl is definietly an Irish folk song at this point...

 

 

It was a driver and, no, we didn't have a discussion until I had skulled it (pardon the pun) into the ravine.  I believe he said something to the effect of "You're fecked". Then he regaled us with his history lesson.  It is a notoriously difficult course -- no fringes and plenty of cliffside hazards.  They require all players to have a handicap of 18 or lower, but we just had to get off the first tee without looking like total hackers.  The caddies, of course, were on to the duffers in the group from the start...

A good tip remedies the hacker issue...

"You're fecked"...thank you for responding to my question as that...made my day, very funny and no doubt said in all seriousness...

The golf courses in the UK...a very different breed...I like your description...reminds me of watching part of the British Open at St Andrews in Scotland I think...between the course and the weather, I felt bad for the players...insanely windy, the occasional squall, and as you noted cliffside hazards...and they probably have their own legend or lore as well...

 

I've seen Steve Earle perform several times and he always tells these stories before performing Galway Girl.  He also says he was trying to fit in.  I guess it worked.

Wow. Hugely surprised to see this pop up in my No Depression news feed, as I sit here in Galway :-)  Last year's street performance would have featured a lot more people if only Galway's streets were wider. Loads of people showed up but couldn't get anywhere near the actual event. Here's a clip of "Galway Girl" Joyce Redmond, duetting with a worse-for-wear Shane MacGowan (and Sharon Shannon) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Thum1vBAndE

Thanks so much for the column.  I've loved that song since the first time I heard it.  Now I've got two more versions of it to go and find.  

Ed, if you ever rename this column, "Nuggets" or "Pearls" might make sense, love the frequently off the beaten path topics. Hadn't heard anyone's version of this song before, the video of the street festival is magic.  If I hadn't read the story behind the song I may still have thought Earle's version a bit wistful. Certainly it's not bursting with joy like the version in the street festival video. Great tune.