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Easy Ed's Broadside

Exploring music without a map.

Since 2009, Ed has shared his thoughts on ND about music that touches him, and rambled hither and yon about what else is on his mind.

Easy Ed's Broadside

Exploring music without a map.

Since 2009, Ed has shared his thoughts on ND about music that touches him, and rambled hither and yon about what else is on his mind.

No Depression Number 43

I dug my copy out of the basement and leafed through it.  Some thoughts:

The first live review was of a Linda Thompson show at the now gone Bottom Line in NYC.  Two of her children were part of the band and son Teddy was the bandleader.  She was touring on her excellent comeback album Fashionably Late.  I saw a show on that tour at The Birchmere in Alexandri, VA, so I guess that was fifteen years ago.  I remember that show extremely fondly and wouldn't have hesitated to see her again, but I don't know that she's ever toured again.  One touching moment in the show was when something went wrong (memory is vague about exactly what) and Linda was trying to compose herself to try again and was maybe nervous and apologetic toward the audience for making us wait.  Teddy said something to comfort her like "they've waited for you for this long, so they can wait another minute."  She looked over at him warily and he said "I'm serious."  And he was right.

The run up to the Iraq War was going on.   There's a letter from an angry conservative complaining about the fawning coverage of Steve Earle, among other things.  The letter writer then proceeds to throw the baby out with the bath water and cancels his subscription.  Such righteousness!

I bought that Caitlin Cary solo album when it came out (While You Weren't Looking) and the next one (I'm Staying Out), which came out in 2003.  I think there was a full length feature on her earlier in 2002.  What I remember most was her description of how Ryan Adams would sabotage every third Whiskeytown show with some form of diva behavior that he would justify as being "punk rock." I remember thinking "that little jerk."  And that feeling has been reinforced many times over the years.

There's a short article on Kathleen Edwards that I'm pretty sure I didn't read.  I think her first album Failer came out in 2003.   I do remember reading a couple of long features on her in the following years.  I finally took the plunge and bought her third album (Asking For Flowers) in 2008 and shortly therafter, her first two.  I saw her play at the 9:30 Club in DC when she was touring on her fourth (and last?) album Voyageur.  One of the best damn shows I've ever seen.  I wish I'd seen her sooner and I sure do miss her.

One of the reporting stores for the Top 40 albums list was Tower Records in Fairfax, VA.  At the time, I lived alone and within walking distance of that store.  Sometimes, when feeling a bit lonely, I'd go there just to be out in the world and look through the CDs, magazines and books and listen to whatever they were playing. It did me good.   I do miss Tower Records.

@Jack: Thanks for taking the time to dig deeper. I read all of that too and especially loved the letters from readers. Reminded me of our comments here. Peter, Grant and I communicated after I published this and while I think they’re a bit sad to see the archives in dis-repair, Grant’s take offered a different perspective. To paraphrase, he said that the magazine was never meant to be read online, so if the new management decides to nuke it, so be it. Leave the corpse alone was his advice.