Column

Easy Ed's Broadside

Exploring music without a map.

Since 2009, Ed has shared his thoughts on ND about music that touches him, and rambled hither and yon about what else is on his mind.

Easy Ed's Broadside

Exploring music without a map.

Since 2009, Ed has shared his thoughts on ND about music that touches him, and rambled hither and yon about what else is on his mind.

The Rolling Stones in Five Easy Pieces

I'd have played that a dozen times too...it's great, and I've not heard that version ever, but I have to have it...the last time I was in NYC (2011) some of my co-workers and I decided to walk from our hotel on 34th St in Manhattan through Central Park to our destination for that morning, which was in Harlem, rather than subway or cab...I recommend that to anyone...it was early summer, but we lucked out weather wise...beautiful...of course, I didn't have the benefit of digital music for that sojourn but I did have my co-workers who are also friends...exhiliarating, vibrant....if you don't walk to some of your destinations there, you are missing a lot...Harlem is amazing, not what people probably think at all...later we did travel by subway to Red Hook in Brooklyn because we just did not have time to walk...I'd love to walk all of that someday...that was 7 hours well spent Ed...thanks for sharing...if I ever get there again, and the weather is grand, I will look you up...

I love that album "Stripped" for the different versions but a highlight for me is their version of Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone."

Ed makes it easy to navigate a crowded market of Stones releases and I also find great inspiration when doing my hour and a half walk in Ayrshire - but that's without music. I wait till I get home then play what i've been thinking about. Recently that's been Blondie, Nina Simone and The Who. I've got Metaphorphosis on record but not Flowers, I hope to remedy that after reading this article. Thanks Ed

Comedian Michael Che notes on Netflix that he lives in a white neighborhood now that he is successful: Harlem.  He comments that white women get whatever they want whether it's someone's hat in a club when they want to dance, or a gentrified neighborhood if it somehow strikes their whim.

My father was born in Harlem and grew up in the Bronx. The drummer in a band I played in lived on 124th near Lennox, Rice High School is on the corner and the students are taught by the same Irish Christian Brothers as used to teach at Power Memorial HS and at my high school in NJ. We used to lunch at Sylvia's on fried chicken, grits, and greens when it was a neighborhood soul food joint. 

I have walked through large swathes of Harlem since the mid-1970's to shop, visit friends, etc. In decades past the only white tourists I encountered were from Europe who instead of fearing Black Americans and their culture, embraced & sought out their jazz, culinary and political itineraries to visit the places where it all happened.

Even when we lived all the way down on East 3rd Street on Saturday morning we would walk up to La Marqueta in Spanish Harlem to shop for Caribbean food products that my wife needed for the weekend's dinners. We would treat ourselves to a bus ride back home after loading up.

I encourage everyone to visit everywhere, this way there are no ghettoes, no garrisons, no strangers, no outsiders.
 New York City is a terrific place in which to do this.