Column

From the Source

Interviews with the familiar, the fresh, and the just plain interesting

Cara's zealous love for music and knack for talking to strangers has landed her countless gigs at music festivals and as a writer.

From the Source

Interviews with the familiar, the fresh, and the just plain interesting

Cara's zealous love for music and knack for talking to strangers has landed her countless gigs at music festivals and as a writer.

The Yawpers: "You Need A Hammer AND An Egg To Make A Mess."

Well I liked that piece a lot Cara...nice job...the video is pretty in your face...

Hey Jim - Happy New Year (ish) and thank you. Do you think you will get to see them at all over the coming months?

I checked the tour schedule...they aren't anywhere close through the end of March...hopefully they'll come to the midwest...Bloodshot is based in Chicago, but they are from Colorado, so I don't know how much presence they actually have in the midwest...I'd heard of them, but your article is the first time I've listened and really became aware of them and what they are doing...I'd definitely go see them if they come this way and I've got a couple of friends who would go too...they are definitely on the list.

Happy New Year to you too!  Always enjoy your columns.

I just had to check a map, my geography is poor. On looking, I get your point, however like you say hopefully (and probably) there will be more touring. By all accounts their live show is beyond good. I would like to see them. I'd like to see all that coming from acoustic guitars for a start. Ach sure, maybe a European tour is in the offing at some stage. That's interesting what you said about Bloodshot, would they seriously have less coverage midwest? They are highly regarded way over here.

Bloodshot is highly regarded here too, their artists are all top of the line...Robbie Fulks, Ryan Adams (Heartbreaker, which I'd argue is his best solo record)...I'd guess there will be a midwest tour at some point, it just isn't real soon...almost no one makes money from recordings anymore so I would guess they play 150- 200 shows a year like most bands/artists.  Seems that their music is infused with some real aggression, attitude/anger, and that usually makes for a great show...my friends and I are all pushing 60, but we still love that kind of show...

And Dexter Romweber (whooop), I think is on Bloodshot. 

Exactly Jim. Yawpers are pissed off, and that mixed with those smarts augers well for a good show. (I do enjoy a good pissed off band). Their touring seems pretty relentless for the past while, but this very minute is an important one so, here's hoping. Apart from anything else, that voice is important. I'm not too far behind you in years by the way - and you just can't beat a good pissed off band. Ho!

I also meant to say that their album review by Raymond E Lee is a cracker.

Raymond's review was a good one (a "cracker" being a good term in your vernacular)...I remember reading that at the time...he said they were going to piss a lot of people off...and so they may...that is why we love the music in the first place...some of it shakes the foundations and questions the status quo...

Dexter is (or at least was) on Bloodshot...Third Man Records too...not sure who has him currently...he's from Indiana originally, which is where I live...

Ah no! I forgot!! Balls! I go round telling people about that word here, always a talking point. And then I go and use it ...

Have you seen Dexter? He has that couldgetoutofcontrolatanypoint vibe to me. I like. Would love to see him. You're from David Corley land.

No problem with Cracker with me, I knew you meant it's good...I have seen Dexter, but it's been a while...I'd go again.  He does have that vibe, but he didn't...sort of like a modern day Hasil Adkins, the rocakabilly one man band from Boone County, North Carolina...difference was is Hasil did get out of control often...sort of like Jesco White, also from Boone County...out of control...period...

Corley is from Lafayette, which is north of me about 75 miles...I'm from Anderson, IN, which is close to Indianapolis...or as some folks call it, India - no - place...

 

Let us not forget Hasil Adkins if we're talking couldgetoutofcontrolatanypoint.....

 

By the way, as a North Carolina guy, Hal was nice enough to NOT point out that Hasil and Jesco are from Boone County, West Virginia, not North Carolina...my mistake...I was actually listening to Southern Comfort on the Skids, who are from NC when I was typing that...must have been subliminal suggestion from Rick Miller that I typed North Carolina...my mistake in no way dilutes Hasil Adkins' one man band fury, lovely example Hal, and thanks!!...nothing like that anywhere exactly, what in the world is he getting at with all that "push in, push out"?.  There's an interview out on the internet with Hasil, originally ran in some publication called Razorcake...Bradley somebody interviewed him, a while back, as he died not too long ago (someone ran over him on his front porch with an off the road vehicle, I believe)...he claimed he could play "12 to 20 intruments" at the same time, and that he'd written 7,000 songs (and most of them are 2 minutes or less, I'm sure)...it's a great interview, and the prelude to it, where they are trying to get to his house in the hills is great too...the guy was really out there...someone was trying to make a documentary about him at one point, but I don't think it ever happened.  Cara, if you want to know about Boone County, West Virginia, the other guy I mentioned, Jesco White (the world's greatest Appalachian Tap Dancer who "know's 58 steps more than anyone else") has been immortalized (if you can call it that) twice in documentary format, 1981's "Dancing Outlaw" (released on DVD in 2005) and in the mid 2000's there was "The Wild and Wonderful White's of West Virginia"...If you want to know how Hasil got to be Hasil, you'd probably be advised that Boone County is an incredibly economically depressed area, rampant with drugs, firearms, and undereducated people, etc.   Tough place to be from...fascinating documentary pieces.  If your not intereted in going that deep, there's plenty of Youtube featuring Hasil's music and Jesco's dancing and great interview pieces...

Jim, I somehow missed your answer - and it has a wealth of info in it for me to chase up. I really appreciate that and will be responding accordingly after I've searched some of this stuff out.  Especially that Razorcake interview.

I love that quote from Jesco White about knowing 58 more steps than anyone else. It's almost as high as my 61 excuses for procrastination, of which this is #23. As for the push in, push out, on reading that wiki description I have an idea what he's getting at.

I better go do some work

Don't do it. Don't open that book. The next thing you know you're doing "The Hunch" and that's pretty much the end of the Cara we once knew.

 

Hahaha, Cara is the one that wrote about the Yawpers, I bet she's going down that road despite your warining...he mentions the "Hunch", and "Chicken Walk" in the interview...the interview goes on for 2-3 hours...he sent them to get Budweiser on their way up the mountain, and then sent one of the guys out for more during the interview, they have a tough time getting to his place, the dogs get after them...sort of glad he did it, as he got run over by the 4 wheeler the next year...he may not have been educated much, but he was a clever and funny guy, albeit a bit crazy...and he did leave us the "Hunch"..."No More Hot Dogs" is a classic too...I love the talking part in the middle of the Hunch...my favorite thing about him though is although he can clearly keep time, play, sing, and write songs, he doesn't really follow any rules...he'll go two beats too short in one measure, 6 too long in the next...the song repeats the chorus sometimes, in other songs it never does...what he does in one verse he doesn't follow in the second verse, yet the song sort of holds together...it is no wonder he ended up being a one man band...who could follow what he was doing?  Well, I will sign off now that you and I have corrupted Cara...

I almost hate to recommend this stuff to people, but it's so weird and out there, and sort of exists in a vacuum...and it is real...you would likely agree that Hasil's music does have a raw authenticity, and the one man band thing, he was dead serious about that...and he really did get run over by some kid on a 4 wheeler off road vehicle, where they live it was/is very depressed economically, mostly coal miners and timber workers...As for Jesco White, I don't know what you can make of that exactly either...he's defintiely entertaining, and he really can tap dance, and there's some footage of it, normally to the Ozark Mountain Daredevil's "If You Wanna Get to Heaven (You've Got to Raise a Little Hell)...they put the microphone down by his  feet, and he dances up a storm and then picks the mike up and sings along with the chorus...it's not quite like anything else I've seen...both of the documentary films I've mentioned are quite well done, tragic comedies, made both funnier and sadder by the fact that this is their real life...the guy who made the" Wild and Wonderful Whites" was a crew member when "Dancing Outlaw" was made, and he always wanted to go back and see what happened to him, his wife, his kids...Jesco is more prominent in the first film...in the second he's still part of the focus, but he's also the patriarch of a family full of drug abusing, glue sniffing, gas huffing, gun toting, welfare frauding folks...fascinating, hilarious, horrifying, sad...

 

 

The documentary about Roky Erikson is another outsider musician film worth seeing (You're Gonna Miss Me). And of course, Two-Headed Cow, the film about  Dexter/Flat Duo Jets is worth watching too!

 

Those are both on my list as of right now...the Roky Erikson I'd heard about..."Two-Headed Cow"...gotta see that...

And thanks - that's very kind.

 

Jim and Hal. I knew hardly anything about Hasil, andno nothing about his Norton Records connection. Thank you - thank you.

Wiki: Adkins grew up in poverty in the midst of the Depression, and his spirited lifestyle is reflected in his music. His songs explored an affinity for chicken, sexual intercourse and decapitation, and were isolated in obscurity until being unearthed in the 1980s. The newfound success secured him a cult following, spawned the Norton Records label, and helped usher in the genre known aspsychobilly