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Bluegrass Rambles

Everything you need to know about bluegrass, whatever that is

Ted is an IBMA-nominated music writer who travels to bluegrass festivals with his wife and picks guitar in as many jams as he can.

Bluegrass Rambles

Everything you need to know about bluegrass, whatever that is

Ted is an IBMA-nominated music writer who travels to bluegrass festivals with his wife and picks guitar in as many jams as he can.

Deconstructing Bluegrass

My thanks to Debbie Durant, who corrected a major factual error in this piece. I've rewritten it to eliminate the error while keeping the essence of what I said. Being able to substantially correct your own published work is one of the terrific advantages of publishing online.

I'm kind of confused by this essay, and how you got from Jean Ritchie to Yonder Mountain is baffling. (As an aside, Jean Ritchie was also a fine songwriter, and at least of acouple of her songs, The L & N Don't Stop Here Any More & Black Waters, have found their way into the repertoires of a few bluegrass bands.) 

As far as the  fathers and mothers of bluegrass are concerned to whom you referring? I'm not sure that John Lomax, Charles Seeger or Woody Guthrie had anything to do with the founding of bluegrass music. 

As far as Bill Monroe and drums are concerned, first of all, no hillbilly string band was using drums in 1939, and it's more likely that Monroe didn't want drums in his band because that was not the sound he was going for. 

Nice Ted. Thank you.